HelpDesk Options



  • @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    Source: All command line?

    I don't understand this one. All scripts are source. No matter how you run Zammad, it is source. There is only the source code, that's the entire application.

    It was phrased as a question because I didn't understand it.

    I'm not sure what the question was, though 🙂

    What does the option mean on zammad.org? Is source the word for this DOS style command line stuff in Linux? I'm just learning this stuff and don't know any of the terminology.



  • @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    Source: All command line?

    I don't understand this one. All scripts are source. No matter how you run Zammad, it is source. There is only the source code, that's the entire application.

    It was phrased as a question because I didn't understand it.

    I'm not sure what the question was, though 🙂

    What does the option mean on zammad.org?

    I was just looking around their site to see if I could figure out what prompted you to ask about that word.

    Zammad is using the term 100% wrong here and it is gibberish. What they mean is installing from a tarball (tarball is a specific type of compressed file like a zip file, but common everywhere outside of Windows) versus installing from a repo. Whoever wrote that part of their documentation is completely confused and doesn't know what they are writing.

    Zammad is a Ruby on Rails application and as such, is a script, and as such is always source.

    Source is short for source code and always means the code of the application, there is no exception. Every install method that they offer (or could offer) is equally source. The one that they call source is no more or less than any other. It's easy to tell how they got confused, it's a non-developer who saw some of these things in a different situation, totally misunderstood what they saw, and repeated it wrong when writing this doc. I could make a video just explaining that, lol.

    But it is always source, and the term is completely misused. That's all that you need to know.



  • @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    Is source the word for this DOS style command line stuff in Linux?

    No. The term for the command line stuff is always "command line interface" or CLI. The thing that takes your commands at the command line is a shell. CMD.exe and PowerShell are the big shells on Windows. BASH is the big shell on Linux. You can also use PowerShell on Linux, works just fine. No reason to, it's a horrible shell, but it is there and totally works - it really shows how slow it is when you use it outside of Windows and have things to compare against.

    But the terms in Linux aren't different from Windows. It's all the same stuff. CLI, shell, source, etc.



  • From digging into Zammad's site, it looks like CentOS and Ubuntu are both well supported pretty much equally. So either is fine.

    Don't install a GUI, it will immediately make everything really hard and frustrate everyone trying to help you. If you have a GUI it will feel like you are supposed to use it, and there is nothing in a GUI that could assist, only things that will make things hard.



  • @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    Is source the word for this DOS style command line stuff in Linux?

    No. The term for the command line stuff is always "command line interface" or CLI. The thing that takes your commands at the command line is a shell. CMD.exe and PowerShell are the big shells on Windows. BASH is the big shell on Linux. You can also use PowerShell on Linux, works just fine. No reason to, it's a horrible shell, but it is there and totally works - it really shows how slow it is when you use it outside of Windows and have things to compare against.

    But the terms in Linux aren't different from Windows. It's all the same stuff. CLI, shell, source, etc.

    So I'm reading through the install guide and noticed for the Ubuntu option is says "install on Ubuntu via DEB". Is DEB a shell?



  • @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    Is source the word for this DOS style command line stuff in Linux?

    No. The term for the command line stuff is always "command line interface" or CLI. The thing that takes your commands at the command line is a shell. CMD.exe and PowerShell are the big shells on Windows. BASH is the big shell on Linux. You can also use PowerShell on Linux, works just fine. No reason to, it's a horrible shell, but it is there and totally works - it really shows how slow it is when you use it outside of Windows and have things to compare against.

    But the terms in Linux aren't different from Windows. It's all the same stuff. CLI, shell, source, etc.

    So I'm reading through the install guide and noticed for the Ubuntu option is says "install on Ubuntu via DEB". Is DEB a shell?

    DEB (and RPM) are software package formats. On Windows, the equivalent is NuGet as used by Chocolatey.



  • @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    @scottalanmiller said in HelpDesk Options:

    @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    Source: All command line?

    I don't understand this one. All scripts are source. No matter how you run Zammad, it is source. There is only the source code, that's the entire application.

    It was phrased as a question because I didn't understand it.

    I'm not sure what the question was, though 🙂

    What does the option mean on zammad.org?

    I was just looking around their site to see if I could figure out what prompted you to ask about that word.

    Zammad is using the term 100% wrong here and it is gibberish. What they mean is installing from a tarball (tarball is a specific type of compressed file like a zip file, but common everywhere outside of Windows) versus installing from a repo. Whoever wrote that part of their documentation is completely confused and doesn't know what they are writing.

    Zammad is a Ruby on Rails application and as such, is a script, and as such is always source.

    Source is short for source code and always means the code of the application, there is no exception. Every install method that they offer (or could offer) is equally source. The one that they call source is no more or less than any other. It's easy to tell how they got confused, it's a non-developer who saw some of these things in a different situation, totally misunderstood what they saw, and repeated it wrong when writing this doc. I could make a video just explaining that, lol.

    But it is always source, and the term is completely misused. That's all that you need to know.

    Ah, see, I thought "maybe they mean Source Code" but in all honesty that wouldn't have gotten me much further. You're explanation is both needed and appreciated.



  • On CentOS the install looks to be this easy, just run these three commands as root...

    yum -y install epel-release wget
    wget -O /etc/yum.repos.d/zammad.repo https://dl.packager.io/srv/zammad/zammad/stable/installer/el/7.repo
    yum -y install zammad


  • @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    Ah, see, I thought "maybe they mean Source Code" but in all honesty that wouldn't have gotten me much further. You're explanation is both needed and appreciated.

    They meant source code, but whoever wrote it doesn't know what source code is and it makes no sense.

    What they should have said is...

    Install from TarBall without a Repo

    Or CentOS via RPM, Ubuntu via DEB, etc.



  • They meant source code, but whoever wrote it doesn't know what source code is and it makes no sense.

    What they should have said is...

    Install from TarBall without a Repo

    Or CentOS via RPM, Ubuntu via DEB, etc.

    Gotcha. Thanks, I'm almost a pro at this already.



  • @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    I'm almost a pro at this already.

    nearly there 🙂



  • @G-I-Jones said in HelpDesk Options:

    They meant source code, but whoever wrote it doesn't know what source code is and it makes no sense.

    What they should have said is...

    Install from TarBall without a Repo

    Or CentOS via RPM, Ubuntu via DEB, etc.

    Gotcha. Thanks, I'm almost a pro at this already.

    https://republicofit.com/topic/7825/sam-learning-linux-system-administration



  • I would definitely install Zammad via repo instead of docker.

    There docker image is a single container based application designed to have Zammad up and running fast for testing purposes.
    https://docs.zammad.org/en/latest/contributing/install-docker.html#install-with-docker



  • For testing purposes, it was pretty easy to setup Zammad via docker using podman on Fedora 31.

    sudo sysctl -w vm.max_map_count=262144
    sudo podman container run -ti --rm --name zammad -p 80:80 zammad/zammad
    


  • @black3dynamite said in HelpDesk Options:

    For testing purposes, it was pretty easy to setup Zammad via docker using podman on Fedora 31.

    sudo sysctl -w vm.max_map_count=262144
    sudo podman container run -ti --rm --name zammad -p 80:80 zammad/zammad
    

    Yeah I pretty much default to Podman for 99% of the stuff I'm testing. Or if I "need" a VM I'll use Vagrant.

    But Podman might be a little much for this conversation.





  • To come back around to the initial question, I'll throw GLPI + FusionInventory into the mix as a decent replacement for SpiceWorks. You keep the ability to have your whole IT environment managed and documented in a single system (Equipment, users, ticketing, contracts, contacts etc etc....)


Log in to reply