Miscellaneous Tech News



  • @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use.

    Fedora DESKTOP, not Fedora.



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    No, that's when it's old. When it is in Fedora Server is when it's production.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.

    For the same reason that Fedora is trying to push it now... The vendor (SuSE, for us) thought it was a good idea to push as a sensible default at the time.



  • @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.

    For the same reason that Fedora is trying to push it now... The vendor (SuSE, for us) thought it was a good idea to push as a sensible default at the time.

    Fedora isn't pushing now, that's for desktops. Where those things don't really matter. And BtrFS has been pretty stable for a while now. No idea what Suse was up to, but blindly taking defaults is never a good idea. That's how people got RAID 5 from Dell for years. Another example of a commonly bad default... EXT4. In that case, it's stable, it's just not as stable or as fast.



  • @scottalanmiller Agreed - I am looking forward to trying this on the Desktop side of things. Having the Fedora guys behind it should help with its implementation.



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @dafyre said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    We had it in production here on several systems. We suffered no end of FS corruption, and snapshots that won't delete for various reasons...systems randomly hanging and going down... We've upgraded all of the systems to newer OSes and use EXT4.

    Why EXT4 and not XFS? XFS is the mature, stable, fast one.

    Why were you using BtrFS in production? It's not considered ready even now, let alone anytime in the past. It's hoped to be classified as production in 1-2 years.

    For the same reason that Fedora is trying to push it now... The vendor (SuSE, for us) thought it was a good idea to push as a sensible default at the time.

    Fedora isn't pushing now, that's for desktops. Where those things don't really matter. And BtrFS has been pretty stable for a while now. No idea what Suse was up to, but blindly taking defaults is never a good idea. That's how people got RAID 5 from Dell for years. Another example of a commonly bad default... EXT4. In that case, it's stable, it's just not as stable or as fast.

    Hmm... I'd like to think that things on desktops do matter, lol. Kinda hard to use Linux to watch videos or play games if my FS is corrupted and not working.

    I do hope it is stable for those who do use it, at least.



  • @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.



  • @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.

    Still today?



  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.

    Still today?

    2a5b4450-1788-4bad-b213-7c752cb02a30-image.png

    d5b5ac5d-045b-49d4-9741-44ad2433322b-image.png



  • Coronavirus: Scotland developing its own contact-tracing app

    Scotland is developing its own coronavirus contact-tracing app, which it hopes to have ready for use in the autumn.
    It follows the failure of an NHS-branded app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. On Thursday, Northern Ireland became the first part of the UK to deploy a contact-tracing app. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland decided to adapt software already being used in the Republic of Ireland. Contact-tracing apps are designed to help prevent a second wave of the coronavirus. They work by logging when two people have been in close proximity to each other for a substantial period of time. If one of the users is later diagnosed as having the disease, an alert can be sent to others they have recently been close to, telling them that they should also get tested and/or self-isolate.



  • @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @black3dynamite said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @Pete-S said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @jmoore said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Will have to do some reading to see what's changed in last few years. I admit I have not kept up with it.

    BtrFS has been the "future" filesystem for Linux for years. But it's not been far enough along for most places to put into production yet. It's just getting to that point, now. That's why it is going to desktops, but not servers, at this point. This is the stage prior to it starting to replace XFS and EXT4 in production servers.

    It's Facebook that have had problems with scaling xfs and invested a lot in btrfs.
    As you said, Fedora users are just beta testers for real production use. Consider it production ready when it ends up in RHEL.

    I read this a couple of weeks ago. Has some more info: https://lwn.net/Articles/824855/

    OpenSuse uses Btrfs by default.

    Still today?

    2a5b4450-1788-4bad-b213-7c752cb02a30-image.png

    d5b5ac5d-045b-49d4-9741-44ad2433322b-image.png

    Even Leap, wow!



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Coronavirus: Scotland developing its own contact-tracing app

    Scotland is developing its own coronavirus contact-tracing app, which it hopes to have ready for use in the autumn.
    It follows the failure of an NHS-branded app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. On Thursday, Northern Ireland became the first part of the UK to deploy a contact-tracing app. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland decided to adapt software already being used in the Republic of Ireland. Contact-tracing apps are designed to help prevent a second wave of the coronavirus. They work by logging when two people have been in close proximity to each other for a substantial period of time. If one of the users is later diagnosed as having the disease, an alert can be sent to others they have recently been close to, telling them that they should also get tested and/or self-isolate.

    Is there any evidence that this actually helps with anything?



  • @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Coronavirus: Scotland developing its own contact-tracing app

    Scotland is developing its own coronavirus contact-tracing app, which it hopes to have ready for use in the autumn.
    It follows the failure of an NHS-branded app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. On Thursday, Northern Ireland became the first part of the UK to deploy a contact-tracing app. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland decided to adapt software already being used in the Republic of Ireland. Contact-tracing apps are designed to help prevent a second wave of the coronavirus. They work by logging when two people have been in close proximity to each other for a substantial period of time. If one of the users is later diagnosed as having the disease, an alert can be sent to others they have recently been close to, telling them that they should also get tested and/or self-isolate.

    Is there any evidence that this actually helps with anything?

    Beyond common sense? Yes...

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanpub/article/PIIS2468-2667(20)30157-2/fulltext



  • @Dashrender said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Coronavirus: Scotland developing its own contact-tracing app

    Scotland is developing its own coronavirus contact-tracing app, which it hopes to have ready for use in the autumn.
    It follows the failure of an NHS-branded app in England, which was trialled on the Isle of Wight. On Thursday, Northern Ireland became the first part of the UK to deploy a contact-tracing app. Both Scotland and Northern Ireland decided to adapt software already being used in the Republic of Ireland. Contact-tracing apps are designed to help prevent a second wave of the coronavirus. They work by logging when two people have been in close proximity to each other for a substantial period of time. If one of the users is later diagnosed as having the disease, an alert can be sent to others they have recently been close to, telling them that they should also get tested and/or self-isolate.

    Is there any evidence that this actually helps with anything?

    FFS, contact tracing is a not a new thing. It has long been a known useful tool when dealing with contagions







  • Call for TikTok security check before HQ decision

    An influential backbench MP has called on the government to carry out a security review of TikTok before its Chinese owner decides whether to base the app in the UK.
    Neil O'Brien - co-founder of the China Research Group of Tory MPs - said the intelligence services should publish a report into the matter. President Trump is threatening to ban TikTok in the US. This has forced the app to ditch plans to establish its headquarters there. TikTok had been expected to pick California or New York - where it already has offices - after appointing an American ex-Disney executive as its chief executive in May. However, the US president has since given it an ultimatum to sell its local business to an American firm.



  • Twitter users urged to update over Android security flaw

    Millions of Twitter users will be asked to update their Android app after the company found a security flaw.
    Twitter said the vulnerability could let other malicious apps access private information such as direct messages. It said most users were already protected by an Android security update, but 4% were still vulnerable. Twitter said anyone still affected by this flaw would get an in-app notification "to let them know if they need to do anything". "We don't have evidence that this vulnerability was exploited by attackers," it added. But it acknowledged "we can't be completely sure" and was taking the highly unusual steps "to keep the small group of potentially vulnerable people safe".



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Twitter users urged to update over Android security flaw

    Millions of Twitter users will be asked to update their Android app after the company found a security flaw.
    Twitter said the vulnerability could let other malicious apps access private information such as direct messages. It said most users were already protected by an Android security update, but 4% were still vulnerable. Twitter said anyone still affected by this flaw would get an in-app notification "to let them know if they need to do anything". "We don't have evidence that this vulnerability was exploited by attackers," it added. But it acknowledged "we can't be completely sure" and was taking the highly unusual steps "to keep the small group of potentially vulnerable people safe".

    Or just don't use the twitter app.



  • @Grey said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    Twitter users urged to update over Android security flaw

    Millions of Twitter users will be asked to update their Android app after the company found a security flaw.
    Twitter said the vulnerability could let other malicious apps access private information such as direct messages. It said most users were already protected by an Android security update, but 4% were still vulnerable. Twitter said anyone still affected by this flaw would get an in-app notification "to let them know if they need to do anything". "We don't have evidence that this vulnerability was exploited by attackers," it added. But it acknowledged "we can't be completely sure" and was taking the highly unusual steps "to keep the small group of potentially vulnerable people safe".

    Or just don't use the twitter app.

    Or don't use twitter.







  • What is Tencent?

    Based in Shenzhen and founded in 1998, the Chinese company Tencent enjoys huge popularity - and profits - in China.
    Its cute penguin symbol is as familiar to Chinese children as the McDonalds "golden arches" logo is to children in the West, says the BBC's China media analyst Kerry Allen. "Tencent is thought of as so much more than just a Chinese company in China - it has gained a reputation as a family-friendly organisation that connects families, friends and work colleagues in a digital age," she said. "It has a business model that other Chinese companies can only envy - it can reach an audience of, basically, everyone." But many people in the West have never heard of it. That doesn't mean it isn't present in our everyday lives, though - Tencent also owns chunks of some of Western culture's most popular games, music and movies.





  • @scottalanmiller said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    https://itsfoss.com/pinta-new-release/

    The hell after that long how many people would think the project is at all viable



  • @mlnews said in Miscellaneous Tech News:

    What is Tencent?

    Based in Shenzhen and founded in 1998, the Chinese company Tencent enjoys huge popularity - and profits - in China.
    Its cute penguin symbol is as familiar to Chinese children as the McDonalds "golden arches" logo is to children in the West, says the BBC's China media analyst Kerry Allen. "Tencent is thought of as so much more than just a Chinese company in China - it has gained a reputation as a family-friendly organisation that connects families, friends and work colleagues in a digital age," she said. "It has a business model that other Chinese companies can only envy - it can reach an audience of, basically, everyone." But many people in the West have never heard of it. That doesn't mean it isn't present in our everyday lives, though - Tencent also owns chunks of some of Western culture's most popular games, music and movies.

    Ive got a little stock in them, they have slowly but consistently grown in value.


Log in to reply